Whitney Storey Blog

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Moving Through

Whitney Storey, MS, PLPC | Relationship Counseling | Lafayette, LA

I Love Love

Most mental health professionals prefer to work with clients individually. Each person has such unique needs, learning histories, beliefs, fears, and goals - and there's so much benefit from being able to focus all of the therapeutic attention to that one person.

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The Curse of the Shoulds

As I'm writing this, we have just come out of another Mother's Day and I am thinking ahead to the next few holidays and what my family will be doing. Holidays, and family get-togethers in general, can really cause a lot of anxiety in me and in many of the folks I talk to (in and out of the therapy room). There is just so much pressure - so many shoulds, have tos, musts, and can'ts. When it comes to these rules, as I call them, who is in charge?

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Whitney Storey, MS, PLPC, CBE | Therapist | Lafayette, LA | Neurodiversity

Where are all the Other Neurodivergent Parents?

There are so many wonderful things about being a parent. There is nothing better than being able to watch your children grow and change, discover things about themselves and the world, and develop their own unique personality! At the same time, being a parent is one of the most difficult and, at times, painful roles. For those of us who identify as neurodiverse, parenting has another added level of difficulty.

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Whitney Storey, MS, PLPC, CBE | Anxiety | Limbic System

Out of My Mind

When I talk to clients about their struggles, I notice a very familiar pattern that I find myself in: what causes the struggle becomes the focus of our life and we become fused with it. We believe we must get rid of these thoughts (or feelings, memories, urges, etc.) so that we can live a life we dream of living.

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Whitney Storey, MS, PLPC, CBE | Therapist | Anxiety | Lafayette, LA

What does Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Have for Me?

If you were to randomly choose a therapist, you would likely end up with someone who uses cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which has been the dominant type of therapy since the 1960s. The general premise of traditional CBT is that our thoughts influence our emotions, which then go on to influence our behavior. So, the idea is that if we can improve our thinking, our emotions and behavior will therefore improve.

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